• CCI's Home Energy Showcase is a Success

    But We're Just Getting Started

    Pittsburgh Is Ready to Take Charge.

    We're calling on YOU to join in on the effort!
    (412) 431-4623​
  • CCI's Home Energy Showcase is Done...

    But We Aren't!

    Reduce Your Home's Carbon Footprint

    Mobilize today!
    (412) 431-4623​

Contact Us

So, what are you waiting for?
Upgrade your home today! Fill out this form to get more information and get started.

Call us at (412) 431-4623 today!

 

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CCI’s Home Energy Showcase called on Pittsburgh-region homeowners to take action to reduce the portion of their greenhouse gas emissions tied to their home. See how you stack up against the winners by getting your own Sound Home Plan. What is Sound Home Plan? Watch this quick video to find out!

Home Energy Showcase Results

Amount of energy used in Showcase homes vs. the amount of estimated energy saved.

CCI's Home Energy Showcase Identifies Massive Energy Saving Potential

The annual COemissions produced from an average home in the Pittsburgh region are a whopping 13 tons. When added up, they make up 25% of Pittsburgh’s total greenhouse gas emissions, as reported in the latest Climate Action Plan. Increasing your home’s energy efficiency and changing a few behaviors in how you use energy can substantially decrease these emissions and your personal carbon footprint.

Starting last August, 54 Pittsburgh area homeowners signed up to drop pounds of carbon, reduce energy usage, and learn more about how to make their house a higher-performing, more comfortable and healthier home. The Showcase participants who took at least one action reduced their home’s CO2 emissions by an estimated average of 1.3 tons annually. That would take about 30 mature trees growing for a full year to sequester this amount of CO2. As a cohort, that is equivalent to the climate-saving carbon contribution from 962 mature trees.

Showcase Participants Find Potential to Reduce CO2 Emissions by 3.7 Tons Annually

(Simply click a name and read about their story!)

Name Affiliation Year Built Size of Home Household Size Tons of COPer Year Therms of Gas Per Year KWh of Electricity Per Year Energy Saving Potential Project Status
Matt Mahoney KEEA 1910 1,380 sf 4 12.6 t 1,559 7,108 50% Small Progress
Kathy Hrabovsky & Michael Oppenheimer 3R Sustainability 1939 1,906 sf 2 13.4 t 1,560 8,774 36% Small Progress
Meghan Scanlon   1939 1,287 sf 1 7.8 t 981 4,190 33% N/A
LN Blackburn Blackburn Greenworks 1988 3,751 sf 3 12.4 t 1,146 10,425 29% N/A
Mike S.   1900 3,696 sf 4 19.9 t 3,081 5,890 38% Project Completed
Flore Marion   1910 3,152 sf 4 21 t 2,739 10,674 48% In Progress
Sarah States Phipps Conservatory 1910 2,466 sf 2 12.5 t 1,572 6,849 23% Project Completed
Aftyn G. City of Pittsburgh 1934 1,435 sf 1 8.4 t 1,033 4,786 67% N/A
Gail Harper   1951 1,878 sf 2 10.5 t 1,088 7,729 29% In Progress
Erika Strassburger City of Pittsburgh 1920 1,704 sf 3 12.6 t 1,734 5,591 36% N/A
Peter Cormas   1920 1,336 sf 2 8.7 t 941 6,007 37% Project Completed
Bryan Pendleton   1920 1,780 sf 3 14 t 2,188 4,010 44% Project Completed
Thomas Hoffman   1915 1,404 sf 1 8.6 t 1,070 4,723 19% Project Completed
Stephanie G & Rob F.    1920 1,170 sf 2 10.8 t 1,324 6,237 31% Project Completed
Anna F.   1954 3,957 sf 6 24.1 t 2,764 15,458 18% Small Progress
Sylvia Francis   1930 1,436 sf 1 8.5 t 1,340 2,310 51% N/A
Jessica Semler   1900 2,538 sf 4 17 t 844 20,491 42% N/A
Adriana D.   1988 5,546 sf 4.5 27.9 t 1,428 33,368 24% In Progress
Patrycja and Erik Garrett   1936 1,690 sf 4 8.9 t 1,053 5,494 20% Project Completed
Christian Pegher   1925 1,978 sf 3 11 t 1,299 6,722 39% In Progress
Agnieszka Sornek   1948 1,316 sf 3 8.8 t 939 6,222 24% N/A
Kenneth Dorsey   1910 2,495 sf 4 17.1 t 2,403 7,217 39% Small Progress
Ed and Lynda Wrenn   1900 2,405 sf 3 17.5 t 2,725 4,938 42% Project Completed
Anne R.   1900 3,326 sf 4 13.1 t 1,816 5,744 32% In Progress
Scott & Lori F.    1923 2,166 sf           N/A
Constance Mayer URA of Pittsburgh 1899 1149 sf 2 7.7 t 774 5,930 29% N/A
Kristie S.   1925 1,950 sf 4 9.3 t 1,135 5,415 18% Project Completed
Angelica S.   1920 1,440 sf 4 15.8 t 2,131 7,359 36% N/A
Martina B. City of Pittsburgh 1923

1,814 sf

2 10.8 t 1,485 4,732 26% N/A
Gregory O.   1910

900 sf

2 9.2 t 878 7,516 39% Project Completed
Mark S.   1957 2,608 sf 4 13.7 t 1,101 12,926 37% N/A
Andrea DeVries and Howard Degenholtz   1896 3,810 sf 5 22.6 t 2,244 17,550 36% N/A
Kate C. & Dan G.   1941 1,092 sf 2 7.9 t 609 7,628 19% Project Completed
Katie A. Building Performance Association 1975 2,458 sf 4 14.3 t 943 15,252 25% N/A
Evan M.    1922 1,514 sf 2 13 t 1,427 8,830 38% Project Completed
Mike Phillips Carnegie Mellon University 1950 3,701 sf 2 18.6 1,521 17,226 21% Project Completed
D. White   1950 1,260 sf 4 13.2 1,040 12,586 14% Project Completed
Charles K.   1920 4,142 sf 5 16 t 2,167 7,342 17% Small Progress
Elisabeth U. Green Building Alliance 1920 1,700 sf 2 9.3 t 869 7,650 27% Project Completed
Robert S.   1959 3,023 sf 2 10.5 t 701 11,140 29% Project Completed
Patrick Duffey   1930 1,378 sf 2 4.8 t 711 1,691 36% Project Completed
Matthew Broerman University of Pittsburgh 1920 1,224 sf 2 8.7 t 1,232 3,491 38% N/A
MB & AR   1910 2,450 sf 2 16 t 1,938 9,445 31% Project Completed
Fred B.   1910 1,898 sf 6 19.8 t 1,366 20,050 55% N/A
Cari K.   1916 1,834 sf 4 11.7 t 1,680 4,647 47% N/A
Derek D.   1911 2,064 sf 4 13.9 t 1,644 10,084 18% Small Progress
Simone V.   1900 1,810 sf           N/A
Jason H.   1930 1,350 sf 2 8.4 t 602 8,598 37% N/A
Jennifer Fox CCI 1929 2,174 sf 3 13.2 t 871 14,003 21% N/A
Lindsay Dill Allegheny Land Trust 1910 1,568 sf 1 11.3 t 1,862 2,411 52% Project Completed
Christine Graziano Plant Five for Life 1920 2,295 sf 3 14.2 t 1,494 10,338 25% N/A
Adam Bertonaschi Branch Pattern 1940 1,311 sf 2 7.8 t 722 6,424

35%

Small Progress

Melissa C.   1960 1,694 sf 5 15 t 1,825 8,778 46% Small Progress
Erin Copeland Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy 1930 1,312 sf 3 6.7 t 777 4,202 16% Small Progress
Ginette Walker Vinski Sustainable Pittsburgh 1951 1,242 sf 2 9.9 t 1,237 5,428 55% Small Progress
Sarah O.   1910 2,234 sf 2 12.4t 1,028 11,391 19% Small Progress

 

Second Place Winners Also Did an Outstanding Job!

 

What was the Home Energy Showcase?

CCI’s Home Energy Showcase journey followed Sound Home program process. From there, participants were given the knowledge and access to available resources to make the home upgrades that work best for them and their families. We suggested three main ways to increase home efficiency, health, and safety:

  1. Work with a contractor to perform major home improvements. A home energy contractor can perform specific upgrades from your personalized list of recommendations in your Sound Home Plan report. CCI will connect you to vetted and certified contractors who can perform common energy improvements, such as sealing air leaks in the home, adding insulation in the attic and/or walls, weatherizing or replacing doors and storm windows, or replacing inefficient HVAC equipment. Each of these actions can considerably improve your home’s energy efficiency. See what others have done using contractors participating the Sound Home Program.

     

    • This is undoubtedly the step that will have the greatest impact on your at-home energy reductions. It is strongly encouraged to consider the long term benefits of making such changes (as a climate action, for comfort, health, durability, and eventually, pocket book too, as home energy improvements do pay for themselves in the long run) even as they come with a larger price tag than the next two items.**
  2. DIY actions taken for home improvement.

    • Your personalized energy audit will also include recommendations for DIY home improvements, such as adjusting programmable thermostats, turning off a second fridge, or upgrading to LED lights. If you are handy, any measures listed in 1 can also be executed as DIY!

  3. Undertaking of additional conservation practices/behavioral changes that impact energy use.

    • Small day-to-day behaviors also matter and add up! Examples of such changes include unplugging electronics when not in use (cutting phantom loads), decreasing hot water use, air drying laundry. A list of potential actions will be provided to participants and we ask that you self-report undertaking these to CCI.

*For houses more than 3000 sq ft./more than one furnace or boiler, additional charges apply

**For those worried about the initial cost of contracted home upgrade projects, there are some options available in PA for financing energy efficiency improvements:

  1. PHFA HEELP loan - With 1% interest rate for PA homeowners with incomes below 150% Area Median Income.
  2. NEIF Home Energy Improvement Plan - All income levels are eligible.
  3. Allegheny Home Improvement Loan Program - Eligibility restrictions are included in the link provided. Residents of the City of Pittsburgh are not eligible for this loan.
  4. URA Loan for Income-Qualified Residents of the City

 

 

CCI’s Home Energy Showcase was designed to help homeowners make a commitment to improving their home with an emphasis on energy and carbon reductions. Upgrading one’s home can be a large, but rewarding, project. In order to tackle it, it is important to make a plan, choose a point to start and continue to work towards an overall goal to improve home’s efficiency, durability, and comfort. Beyond the competition, we encourage you to pledge to review your energy audit yearly and set goals for continued home energy improvements!

 

 

 

 

Check out CCI's Sound Home Plan Program page to see what to expect from our audit and view past projects.

 

 

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Contact Us

So, what are you waiting for?
Upgrade your home today! Fill out this form to get more information and get started.

Call us at (412) 431-4623 today!

 

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